Aaron Summers

What Consumes You?

In Life and Culture on June 2, 2015 at 6:34 am

consumer

The consumer in us all poses these questions,

  • “What will you do for me?”
  • “Why should I shop with you?”
  • “Why should I return?”

I have a teen and a tween, so I am now investigating parental software that allows me to check their online presence.  My kids call it spyware…whatever, right?  In one chat, I actually posed the question of why I should purchase from them and not someone else.  They could not give me an adequate answer and I kept searching.  What I am using now is not that company.

What happens when we approach God in the same manner?  Today, millions, believe in multiple gods rather than one God.  In fact, millions of professing Christians even run from God when things are as good as they want, desire, or demand.  The question is then asked of God, “What have you done for me lately?”  This usually stems from asking(praying) for something and not getting what you want.  Like the child, we scream and holler.  Like the consumer, we have no loyalty outside of ourselves and we begin to look for something more suitable to our liking.  Or worse, we just adjust our belief of God and create our own god while we still call that idol God.

What has God done?  The grace of God is expansive!

  • The grace of God has forgiven me at the cross.
  • The grace of God has furnished me life at the empty tomb.
  • The grace of God has fashioned hope for life today.
  • The grace of God has finished the sting of death with the reality.

All of this happened because of Jesus.  Thank you God for Jesus.

God, forgive me when I allow the consumerism and capitalism of my world affect our relationship.  I am sorry when I do not trust.  I am sorry when I look around. I am sorry when I pout and throw a fit because I do not get my way.  You have done so much.  This is truly amazing grace.

  1. A consumer mentality of Christianity results in a quid pro quo status regarding our relationship with God and with other believers. I will pray as long as I see my prayers answered. I will volunteer as long as I receive something in exchange for my ministry. And this type of mindset can easily lead to an atmosphere of suspicion and mistrust within the church body. When we don’t receive what we feel we ought for services rendered, it means that there is something wrong with God and the church. And the problem certainly does not lie with me because I am willing to serve others. Therefore, it is always someone else’s fault. And the finger-pointing begins.

    As you suggested, the remedy to a consumer mentality of Christianity is a return to what most Baptists at least claim to be the standard for their faith and practice – Scripture. We must return to the Word of God and hold fast to the precepts found within. Only in the pages of the Bible do we find a diety that self-sacrificially gave His son to die in our place without any thought of a possible return whatsoever. Yahweh can be completely trusted because He loves us even when we do not love Him in return. The one true God of scripture displays anything but a consumer mentality.

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