Not Me!

 

Family Circus came out with a series of cartoons featuring a mythical character called “Not me”.  When a question, or accusation, came out this was usually the answer from the kids.  It was as if some “ghost” was going around the house spilling, breaking, and kicking things.  As an only child, I couldn’t get away with this.  When Mom would ask, it was hard to blame it on Dad.  But in school and at work it got easier to blame stuff on others. As a parent of 2, well, been there.

As I was reading this morning from Joel 1, the first words out of the mouth of the prophet were to get the attention of all the people.  Have you ever been in a meeting when the speaker is obviously speaking to a certain person but not you?  Have you ever been listening to the preacher and thought, “I sure hope these people are listening”?

God wanted to make sure that everyone was listening so he led Joel to mention the elders and the inhabitants.  Wouldn’t just inhabitants do?

It is very easy to tune out when someone is speaking if you don’t think it is for you.  Often, those in leadership however high or low on that ladder tend to drift into other thoughts when the supervisor is speaking.  I think it is the human condition to assume that whatever is being said, admonished, or accused has to be for everyone else.   I have had countless numbers exit a meeting and mention how I really “gave it to them” today.

  • The next time you are reading scripture think about what it might be saying to you.
  • The next time you are listening to a sermon/speech think about what might be addressed to you.
  • The next time you are in your supervisor’s office consider what is being said to you and not just about your subordinates.

We might miss out on something critical to our growth and success because we are ignoring what is really directed to us too.  We might avoid certain dangers and pitfalls if we would entertain the notion that we could learn from what is being presented.

Just a thought.  How have you missed out because you thought the message was for someone else?

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