Aaron Summers

In Cognito?

In Life and Culture on October 31, 2013 at 10:59 am

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Halloween is such a fun time of year!  I remember dressing up in many ways as a kid.  About 3 years in a row my Dad and I were Dracula.   We wound up favoring Count Chocula more than anything!  We had a great time going trick-or-treating together.  For the last several years, we have enjoyed the opportunity our town provides.  We walk around the town square and go home with 14 lbs of candy each!  What I have noticed is that each year our culture degrades in what is an acceptable level of evil.  Most of us were one of these little “villains” in the picture as some point or another.  Each have bright eyes and a smile.  Today, it seems that anger, rage, blood, and horror are more visible than anything else.4

As a follower of Christ, I have heard people discuss whether or not their children will even dress up.  There is pagan religious themes involved and we should stray away from engaging in anything that smacks of such things.  Here is a brief rundown of the last 200 years.  For a longer history, look here.

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers than about ghosts, pranks and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

By the 1920s and 1930s, Halloween had become a secular, but community-centered holiday, with parades and town-wide parties as the featured entertainment. Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague Halloween celebrations in many communities during this time. By the 1950s, town leaders had successfully limited vandalism and Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated. Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country’s second largest commercial holiday.

The American Halloween tradition of “trick-or-treating” probably dates back to the early All Souls’ Day parades in England. During the festivities, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries called “soul cakes” in return for their promise to pray for the family’s dead relatives. The distribution of soul cakes was encouraged by the church as a way to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for roaming spirits. The practice, which was referred to as “going a-souling” was eventually taken up by children who would visit the houses in their neighborhood and be given ale, food, and money.

The tradition of dressing in costume for Halloween has both European and Celtic roots. Hundreds of years ago, winter was an uncertain and frightening time. Food supplies often ran low and, for the many people afraid of the dark, the short days of winter were full of constant worry. On Halloween, when it was believed that ghosts came back to the earthly world, people thought that they would encounter ghosts if they left their homes. To avoid being recognized by these ghosts, people would wear masks when they left their homes after dark so that the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits. On Halloween, to keep ghosts away from their houses, people would place bowls of food outside their homes to appease the ghosts and prevent them from attempting to enter.

Our kids have all gone to school dressed in their costumes.  Let us enjoy a day of make-believe, humor, and festival.  We have enough real-life issues so many other days.  Here is my one request for a follower of Jesus on this day.  Whatever your costume, remember to be clothed in righteousness.  There are many trashy and ridiculous outfits out there.  Choose better.  Have fun!

But now, apart from the law, God’s righteousness has been revealed — attested by the Law and the Prophets — that is, God’s righteousness through faith in Jesus Christ, to all who believe, since there is no distinction.   For all have sinned and fall short of the   glory of God.  They are justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.  God presented Him as a propitiation through faith in His blood, to demonstrate His righteousness, because in His restraint God passed over the sins previously committed.  God presented Him to demonstrate His righteousness at the present time, so that He would be righteous and declare righteous the one who has faith in Jesus.

Romans 3:21-26

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